Smarter Knowledge Sharing: Quantitative research into the perceived usefulness of Lotus Live as knowledge sharing system by Dutch healthcare professionals

Well this is a find!

Smarter Knowledge Sharing – Quantitative research into the perceived usefulness of Lotus Live as knowledge sharing system by Dutch healthcare professionals

Master Thesis
Strategic Management
Tilburg University
December 12, 2011

Student
Sjoerd Bouma (962256)
S.Bouma@uvt.nl

An organization’s ability to learn and share knowledge has emerged as a key factor influencing organizational performance (Argote, McEvily, & Reagans, 2003; Kane & Alavi, 2007). IBM can provide an integrated cloud solution,  Lotus Live, to support online knowledge sharing and learning. The measurement of information systems usefulness is critical  to understand the value and efficacy of information systems investments  (Delone & McLean, 2003). Therefore, IBM wants to study the usefulness of an integrated cloud solution for knowledge sharing. IBM is especially interested in the added value of Lotus Live in a knowledge-intensive environment (e.g. healthcare, research institutes, and universities). Especially in these type of organizations lifelong learning and knowledge sharing are crucial aspects of everyday’s work.

This study elaborates on knowledge sharing in healthcare. In general, when talking about knowledge sharing in healthcare it concerns collaboration between healthcare professionals (Chau & Hu, 2002a), and access to learning resources (Geueke & Stausberg, 2003). Lifelong learning and knowledge sharing are important concepts in today’s healthcare, and a requirement for all healthcare professionals (Barnard, Nash, & O’Brien, 2005;  Frankford, Patterson, & Konrad, 2000). However, knowledge sharing by face-to-face interaction on a regular basis can be costly and time consuming. Online communities of practice supported by internet technologies are among the few viable alternatives to live conversation and knowledge sharing (Hara & Hew, 2007). It  is therefore, very interesting to look at the usefulness of an online knowledge management system for knowledge sharing in healthcare. The central research question dealt with in this thesis will be:

To what extent is an online knowledge management system for knowledge sharing perceived useful in supporting knowledge sharing in a healthcare context?

Whilst most definitely an academic paper (it is the author’s master thesis), this should be useful reading for anyone with an interest in how cloud-based or on-premise social collaboration tools can be adopted for knowledge sharing purposes, whether in health-care or other similar verticals.  I’m still digesting the findings and recommendations contained in the paper, but can already recommend it – so much around Social technology is fluffy and vague in nature – an academic study can really cut through that to focus on the facts and realities.

Excellent work, Sjoerd.

Stuart McIntyre is a Senior Strategist at Fostering Community Limited. He curates a number of product-focused news sites, is a lapsed podcaster, founded the Social Connections user group and regularly speaks at conferences and events. This blog represents his own slightly-eccentric and usually-controversial opinions!