Lotus Symphony has a Wikipedia entry…

… so it must be good 😉

IBM Lotus Symphony is a set of applications comprising:

   * IBM Lotus Symphony Documents, a word processor

   * IBM Lotus Symphony Spreadsheets, a spreadsheet program

   * IBM Lotus Symphony Presentations, a presentation program


Symphony supports the OpenDocument format (ODF), as well as Microsoft Office and Lotus SmartSuite formats, but not the Office Open XML format used by Microsoft Office 2007. It can also export Portable Document Format (PDF) files.


Symphony is available for Linux and Windows, with Mac OS X support announced for the first half of 2008. It is based on Eclipse Rich Client Platform from IBM Lotus Expeditor for its shell and OpenOffice.org 1.1.4 for the core office suite code.[1] Symphony requires 512 MB of RAM and 540 MB of hard drive space.[2] Because Lotus Symphony is based on the 1.1.4 version of OpenOffice.org which was dual licensed under both the LGPL as well as Sun’s own SISSL which allowed for entities to change the code without releasing their changes, IBM does not have to release the source code of Symphony.


IBM unofficially predicts that it will release version 1.0 of Lotus Symphony in the first quarter of 2008 as a free download. IBM plans to incorporate code from the latest version of OpenOffice.org into version 2.0. Symphony 2.0 will also include modules that are already part of OpenOffice.org, including an equation editor, database software, and a drawing program, as well as other modules specifically provided by IBM.[3].

Clearly someone from IBM is making sure this entry gets updated frequently, which is definitely worthwhile.

Stuart McIntyre is a Senior Strategist at Fostering Community Limited. He curates a number of product-focused news sites, is a lapsed podcaster, founded the Social Connections user group and regularly speaks at conferences and events. This blog represents his own slightly-eccentric and usually-controversial opinions!